Mark S. Gignilliat
Professor of Divinity
Beeson Divinity School
Old Testament
Office:  Divinity Hall
Email: msgignil@samford.edu
Phone: 205-726-4123

Mark Gignilliat began his teaching tenure at Beeson Divinity School in 2005. He teaches Hebrew, Old Testament exegesis and Old Testament theology, with teaching interests including biblical theology, theological exegesis and the history of interpretation. Gignilliat most recently published Reading Scripture Canonically: Theological Instincts for Old Testament Interpretation (Baker, 2019) and Micah in the International Theological Commentary (T&T Clark, 2019). His other books include A Brief History of Old Testament Criticism (Zondervan, 2012) and Karl Barth and the Fifth Gospel (Routledge, 2009). Gignilliat has contributed to various edited books, peer-reviewed journals and magazines. He also serves as the canon theologian at the Cathedral Church of the Advent in Birmingham, Alabama. Gignilliat is married to Naomi and is father to William, Jackson, Franklin, and Mary Grace.

Education

  • Ph.D., University of St. Andrews, Scotland
  • M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 
  • B.A., Bob Jones University

Books

Selected Articles

  • “The Plural Personhood of God in Isaiah’s Servant Songs,” in Lutheran Forum 51 (2017): 14-17.
  •  “God Speaks Hebrew: The Hebrew Text and Septuagint in the Search for the Christian Bible,” in Pro Ecclesia XXV (2016): 154-72.
  • “Who Are Abraham’s Offspring? Isaiah 54:1 in Galatians 4:27,” in Bulletin of Biblical Research 25 (2015): 205-223 .
  • “Oaks of Righteousness for His Glory: Horticulture and Renewal in Isaiah 61.1-4,” Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft123 (2011): 391-405.
  • “Theological Exegesis as Exegetical Showing: A Case of Isaiah’s Figural Potentiality,” International Journal of Systematic Theology 12 (2010): 217-232.

Selected Chapters in Books

  • “The Servants in 2 Corinthians,” The Servants of Isaiah in Reception History (Oxford University Press), forthcoming.
  • “Karl Barth and Isaiah’s Figural Hope,” Karl Barth as Theological Exegete (Baker Academic, 2019).
  • “Karl Barth and Biblical Studies,” Blackwell Companion to Karl Barth, ed. G. Hunsinger (2020).
  • “Modern Criticism and the Reformed Tradition,” for the Oxford Handbook of Reformed Theology, co-authored with Dr. Don Collett, written and forthcoming.
  • “Eternal Generation and a Theological/Hermeneutical Philology: Micah 5:2 as a Test-Case” in Retrieving Eternal Generation (ed. F. Sanders and S. Swain; Grand Rapids: Zondervan Academic, 2017).
  • “The Trinity and the Old Testament: Real Presence or Imposition,” in The Necessity of the Trinity, ed. by Carl Trueman and Brandon Crowe (Paternoster: 2016).
  •  “Theological Commentary,” in Theological Interpretation: A Manifesto, (ed. Heath Thomas and Craig Bartholomew; Baker Academic, 2016).
  • “Who is a God Like You? Refracting the One God in Jonah, Micah, and Nahum,” in Monotheism in Late Prophetic and Early Apocalyptic Literature, FAT II/1 72 (ed. N. MacDonald and K. Brown; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2014), 57-72.
  • “A Shared Reality: Ontology in Brevard Childs’ Isaiah Commentary,” in The Bible as Christian Scripture: The Work of Brevard Childs, ed. C.S. Seitz and K. A Richards (Atlanta: SBL, 2013).

Research Interests

  • Old Testament Studies/Criticism
  • Hebrew Exegesis
  • Biblical Theology
  • The interface of Christian Theology and Biblical Exegesis
  • History of Interpretation/Reception

Involvement

  • Evangelical Theological Society
  • Institute of Biblical Research
  • Society of Biblical Literature
  • Canon Theologian of the Cathedral Church of the Advent, Birmingham

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