From the Dean

News items, published articles, and reading recommendations from Dean Timothy George




Page 4 of 171

The Dean Recommends: The only way to win the “Bragging Game”

By Meg Hunter-Kilmer
July 3, 2016

Lord, you will establish peace for us, for it is you who have accomplished all we have done. –Isaiah 26:12

God forbid that I should glory save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified to me and I to the world. –Galatians 6:14

Summer days in the mid 90s most often found me in the company of Jessica Nielsen, a neighborhood girl about my age who, like me, thought the most important thing about childhood was spending interminable hours with anyone willing to play the role of best friend. We made grand plans to get rich quick, bossed our various siblings around, and played our favorite game ad nauseam: the Bragging Game.

This was an actual game we devised in which we took turns—you guessed it—bragging. It was a very gratifying game for a girl so consumed by the need to impress people. I’d learned that people frown on arrogance but I still wanted to make sure Jessica (and anyone who might happen to overhear) knew all about my Latin test, my ability to click my heels in the air, and my great-grandfather’s reputation.

Because, in the initial stages of the Bragging Game, ancestral accomplishments were fair game. Eventually, though, Jessica had had enough. She was still happy to play the Bragging Game but, she insisted, “It only counts if you did it yourself. Your family stuff doesn’t count.” Read the rest at Aleteia.

Lord, you will establish peace for us, for it is you who have accomplished all we have done. –Isaiah 26:12

God forbid that I should glory save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified to me and I to the world. –Galatians 6:14

Summer days in the mid 90s most often found me in the company of Jessica Nielsen, a neighborhood girl about my age who, like me, thought the most important thing about childhood was spending interminable hours with anyone willing to play the role of best friend. We made grand plans to get rich quick, bossed our various siblings around, and played our favorite game ad nauseam: the Bragging Game.

This was an actual game we devised in which we took turns—you guessed it—bragging. It was a very gratifying game for a girl so consumed by the need to impress people. I’d learned that people frown on arrogance but I still wanted to make sure Jessica (and anyone who might happen to overhear) knew all about my Latin test, my ability to click my heels in the air, and my great-grandfather’s reputation.

Because, in the initial stages of the Bragging Game, ancestral accomplishments were fair game. Eventually, though, Jessica had had enough. She was still happy to play the Bragging Game but, she insisted, “It only counts if you did it yourself. Your family stuff doesn’t count.”

- See more at: http://aleteia.org/2016/07/03/the-only-way-to-win-the-bragging-game/?utm_campaign=NL_en&utm_source=daily_newsletter&utm_medium=mail&utm_content=NL_en-Jul%2003,%202016%2006:00%20am#sthash.PMOOPwrE.dpuf

Lord, you will establish peace for us, for it is you who have accomplished all we have done. –Isaiah 26:12

God forbid that I should glory save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified to me and I to the world. –Galatians 6:14

Summer days in the mid 90s most often found me in the company of Jessica Nielsen, a neighborhood girl about my age who, like me, thought the most important thing about childhood was spending interminable hours with anyone willing to play the role of best friend. We made grand plans to get rich quick, bossed our various siblings around, and played our favorite game ad nauseam: the Bragging Game.

This was an actual game we devised in which we took turns—you guessed it—bragging. It was a very gratifying game for a girl so consumed by the need to impress people. I’d learned that people frown on arrogance but I still wanted to make sure Jessica (and anyone who might happen to overhear) knew all about my Latin test, my ability to click my heels in the air, and my great-grandfather’s reputation.

Because, in the initial stages of the Bragging Game, ancestral accomplishments were fair game. Eventually, though, Jessica had had enough. She was still happy to play the Bragging Game but, she insisted, “It only counts if you did it yourself. Your family stuff doesn’t count.”

- See more at: http://aleteia.org/2016/07/03/the-only-way-to-win-the-bragging-game/?utm_campaign=NL_en&utm_source=daily_newsletter&utm_medium=mail&utm_content=NL_en-Jul%2003,%202016%2006:00%20am#sthash.PMOOPwrE.dpuf
Posted by Hunter Upton at Friday, July 8, 2016
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Patricia Outlaw Dancing to Retirement

By William Nunnelley
Summer 2016

Beeson Divinity School professor Patricia A. Outlaw is looking forward to dancing her way into retirement. “Having been bivocational for the majority of my working life, I am looking forward to the days ahead to dance,” she said.

“In the African tradition, ‘to dance’ is ‘to breathe,’” she explained. “To everything there is a season,” she said, including “a time to dance.”

Outlaw has taught at Beeson Divinity School 15 years. A highlight has been “the privilege of working with a community of believers who frequently pray together in their offices, in their classroom settings and in community worship services.” She said it has been a joy and a privilege to work in a context “where prayer is the norm and not the exception.”

An ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal church, Outlaw serves as pastor of Bethel A.M.E. Church-Rising in Birmingham.

“I don’t think I would have survived as long as I did at Beeson Divinity School had I not been able to combine my teaching and ministry in the classroom setting,” she said. “My training as a psychologist, preacher, professor and pastor equipped me to teach with passion from an academic and pragmatic approach. It is one thing to teach from a mere academic perspective, but it is another thing altogether to teach from the pulpit of a seasoned pastor.”

Outlaw said the most signicant changes in the field of pastoral care and psychology have been the ongoing effort to integrate spiritually and psychology. Thirty years ago, it would have been considered outside the norm for psychologists to give consideration or merit to the spiritual orientation of his or her clients, she said.

Outlaw was the first woman to graduate from Beeson Divinity School’s Doctor of Ministry program (2002). She also holds degrees from Towson State, St. Mary’s Seminary and University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. This article was originally published in the Summer 2016 issue of Samford University's Seasons magazine.

Posted by Kristen Padilla at Wednesday, July 6, 2016
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The Dean Recommends: The Unheralded Monk Who Turned His Small Town into a Center of Publishing

By Andrew Pettegree
December 28, 2015

New media don’t stay new for long, but for first adopters the returns can be transformative. Over repeated cycles of invention there are rich rewards for those who harness new technologies: the pamphleteers and journalist politicians of revolutionary France and America, Charles Dickens and his installment novels, television and John Kennedy. And this is also, to an extent that is seldom acknowledged by historians, the story of the Reformation. Five hundred years ago the conscience of a middle-aged monk plunged Europe into turmoil. The monk was Martin Luther, by any measure an unlikely revolutionary: until this point he was an unknown professor at one of Europe’s more obscure universities. But what made Luther so special, and this too has resonance today, was that he used new media to circumvent the traditional gatekeepers and ordered structures of legitimacy and communication. Luther used the printing press to create a grass-roots movement four centuries before anyone would have understood the term. This was his genius—and it was a genius that transformed western society.

The Reformation was a revolution as profound as any in our collective history, and it would leave European society divided into two bitterly antagonistic churches, Protestant and Catholic. Theologians, families, and states argued and eventually fought. A call for reform became the justification for persecution and genocidal warfare. This was not what Luther intended—and it was amazing that he should have found an audience. His university home, Wittenberg, was a small town on Europe’s remote north-eastern frontier. It was far away from the major centers of population and influence where policy was made.

It was hard to see anything of significance coming from such a place. Yet within five years Luther was the most published author since the invention of printing seventy years before, his books read and reprinted in scores of places. And he had begun a movement that could not be silenced. Read the rest at Literary Hub.

Posted by Hunter Upton at Tuesday, July 5, 2016
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