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Dean's Message


The mission of Beeson Divinity School is to prepare God-called persons to serve as ministers in the Church of Jesus Christ by providing quality theological education from an explicitly evangelical perspective. We aim to do this with joy and passion in a loving community which worships the Triune God and cultivates authentic Christian spirituality.

At Beeson we frequently say that "above all else, we want our students to be men and women of God." Hodges Chapel, where the Beeson community meets for worship, stands at the center of Divinity Hall.  It is redolent with symbols of the faith and decorated with beautiful Christian art. Its cross-shaped form reminds us of the centrality of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Its prominence and location at the heart of our building bears witness to the fact that Beeson is not merely a graduate school for the study of theology, but rather a living community of faith and learning whose highest purpose is "to know God and to enjoy Him forever."

Timothy George

Dean


 

The Dean Recommends: The Reason Why America Burned Spurgeon’s Sermons and Sought to Kill Him

By Christian George
September 22, 2016

Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation 154 years ago today, promising liberty to some 3 million enslaved black men and women.

Charles Spurgeon also fought the evils of slavery:

“[The] hope of deliverance seemed far away, it was God that gave an Abraham Lincoln, who led the nation onward till ‘Emancipation’ flamed upon its banners” (MTP 29:243).

Spurgeon exchanged correspondences with Frederick Douglas, received former slaves into his Pastors’ College and pulpit, and condemned slavery in his sermons and media articles:

“I do from my inmost soul detest slavery . . . and although I commune at the Lord’s table with men of all creeds, yet with a slave-holder I have no fellowship of any sort or kind. Whenever one has called upon me, I have considered it my duty to express my detestation of his wickedness, and I would as soon think of receiving a murderer into my church . . . as a man stealer” (Pike, The Life and Work of Charles Haddon Spurgeon, p. 331).

How did America respond to Spurgeon’s abolition?

Here are a few published comments from different parts of the country:

Florida:  Spurgeon is a “beef-eating, puffed-up, vain, over-righteous pharisaical, English blab-mouth.”

“A Southern Opinion of the Rev. Mr. Spurgeon,” The New York Herald (March 1, 1860). Read the rest at The Spurgeon Center.

Posted by Kristen Padilla at Thursday, September 22, 2016
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Borthwick to Headline Beeson Divinity School’s Annual Missions Emphasis

By Kristen Padilla
September 21, 2016

Samford University’s Beeson Divinity School will hold its annual Go Global missions emphasis Sept. 27–29, featuring Paul Borthwick, director of the Overseas Missions Practicum at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Hamilton, Massachusetts.

Borthwick is author of How to Be a World-Class Christian: Becoming a Part of God’s Global Kingdom. He will preach on Tuesday at 10 a.m. in Reid Chapel and at 11 a.m. in Hodges Chapel, and will give a campus lecture on Wednesday at 3 p.m. in Reid Chapel.

Go Global, a partnership between Beeson Divinity School’s Global Center and Samford’s Office of Spiritual Life, also will feature a missions agency exhibition in Ben Brown Plaza, Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This exhibition provides the opportunity to meet and talk with representatives of missions agencies about possible areas of partnership.

The missions emphasis also will include two campus-wide mobilization worship events with Kristen White, assistant professor and chair of international studies of Belhaven University, Wednesday at 8 p.m. and Thursday at 10 a.m. in Reid Chapel.

For more information, click here.

Posted by Kristen Padilla at Wednesday, September 21, 2016
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The Dean Recommends: A Tribute to J. Alec Motyer (1924-2016)

By Lee Gatiss
August 26, 2016

Born John Alexander Motyer in 1924, he studied at Trinity College, Dublin where he was awarded BA, MA, and BD degrees. He trained for Anglican ministry at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford and was a curate in Lichfield diocese before becoming a theological college tutor in Bristol. He was Vice Principal of Clifton Theological College (1954-1965) before going back into parish ministry at St Luke’s, West Hampstead for 5 years.

The call to theological education remained with him, however, and he soon returned to Bristol and was Principal and Dean of Trinity College there (1971-1981). J. I. Packer was Associate Principal with him during these years, and everyone I’ve ever met who trained there at this time speaks very warmly indeed of the positive, Reformed and evangelical nature of the training and pastoral formation they received under Jim and Alec. The latter left Bristol to take up another ministerial position at Christ Church, Westbourne in 1981, from where he retired in 1989.

Alec was both a scholarly and a popular writer. He was the Old Testament editor of the Bible Speaks Today commentary series, contributing his own unique volumes to that series, on Amos (1974), Philippians (1984), James (1985), and most recently Exodus (2005). His magnum opus (in my humble opinion) is his first commentary on Isaiah, published in 1993, which was followed by other smaller commentaries on the same book, as well as popular level volumes on the Old Testament and on preaching.

He was a close reader of the text, with a keen eye for chiasms and other literary devices in scripture. “I’m not really a scholar,” he once said, “I’m just a man who loves the Word of God.” This came across in everything he wrote and lectured on. I remember being riveted by a talk he gave to the theological students’ fellowship in Oxford when I was an undergraduate (which later became the article on Isaiah, in the list below); and his talks on the covenant at Word Alive in Skegness in 1994 were so utterly gripping and absolutely compelling that I immediately bought the cassette recordings and almost wore my tape player out by listening to them again and again! Read the rest at Church Society.

Born John Alexander Motyer in 1924, he studied at Trinity College, Dublin where he was awarded BA, MA, and BD degrees. He trained for Anglican ministry at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford and was a curate in Lichfield diocese before becoming a theological college tutor in Bristol. He was Vice Principal of Clifton Theological College (1954-1965) before going back into parish ministry at St Luke’s, West Hampstead for 5 years. The call to theological education remained with him, however, and he soon returned to Bristol and was Principal and Dean of Trinity College there (1971-1981). J. I. Packer was Associate Principal with him during these years, and everyone I’ve ever met who trained there at this time speaks very warmly indeed of the positive, Reformed and evangelical nature of the training and pastoral formation they received under Jim and Alec. The latter left Bristol to take up another ministerial position at Christ Church, Westbourne in 1981, from where he retired in 1989. Alec was both a scholarly and a popular writer. He was the Old Testament editor of the Bible Speaks Today commentary series, contributing his own unique volumes to that series, on Amos (1974), Philippians (1984), James (1985), and most recently Exodus (2005). His magnum opus (in my humble opinion) is his first commentary on Isaiah, published in 1993, which was followed by other smaller commentaries on the same book, as well as popular level volumes on the Old Testament and on preaching. He was a close reader of the text, with a keen eye for chiasms and other literary devices in scripture. “I’m not really a scholar,” he once said, “I’m just a man who loves the Word of God.” This came across in everything he wrote and lectured on. I remember being riveted by a talk he gave to the theological students’ fellowship in Oxford when I was an undergraduate (which later became the article on Isaiah, in the list below); and his talks on the covenant at Word Alive in Skegness in 1994 were so utterly gripping and absolutely compelling that I immediately bought the cassette recordings and almost wore my tape player out by listening to them again and again! - See more at: http://churchsociety.org/blog/entry/a_tribute_to_j._alec_motyer_1924_2016#sthash.o73XLZEp.dpuf
Posted by Hunter Upton at Monday, September 19, 2016
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